Why are our turtle\'s nails falling out?

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Flash
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Hi,
I\'m new to this board. I\'ve enjoyed searching this site and have found it and your message boards very informative so I\'m hoping someone here can help me with this.

A little background first...
My daughter received a painted turtle as a gift from a classmate just before school let out. The little boy keeps changing his story when asked about the turtle\'s origins, but I strongly suspect that it originally came from a small lake nearby as I\'ve since found out that they are not sold in pet stores here. I have no idea how long it might have been in captivity so we didn\'t feel comfortable releasing it.

I\'m pretty sure it\'s male, it has fairly long front claws, and its shell is 5 to 6 inches in length. He\'s feisty and has a good appetite but balks at anything that\'s not meat. Apparently the little boy was feeding him corn and bread (no meat?). So far we\'ve given him cooked chicken, pork, beef, crickets, feeder fish, bread and some grubs I found in the garden. He turns up his nose at anything vegetable (lettuce, carrots, etc) and wants nothing to do with turtle sticks.

The little guy seems to be relatively healthy, clear eyes, no soft spots, no breathing issues... Anyway, one of his front claws looked a little funny last night and this morning it\'s gone, along with one of his back ones. I couldn\'t find anything on this and was wondering what might be causing it. He had a little whitish area on the front foot when we got him. Could it be a fungal problem and if so what do I do about it?

TIA for your help!
bonnie_lynn2001
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Fungal Infections

Red Eared Sliders and other turtles can develop fuzzy gray and white patches that are fungal growths. One of the major causes of this is poor water quality and an improper basking area. Make sure you have a good full spectrum or UVB Light that gives off some good heat. Sliders need this for the prevention of fungal infections.

Treatment

Acriflavan is available at most pet stores and will often stop fungal infections when it\'s added to the water. I also recommend Hagen Sulfa bath. If this isn\'t working to well, Please consult your veterinarian.

Algae on your turtle

If algae grow in your rocks and tank decorations, unless they disturb your sense of beauty, you can let them grow. An exception is the long, hairy kind which also makes the water slimy. Those, you should remove. Algae grow in healthy water with enough light. They are a sign, that you are doing something right. Do not use chemicals to kill algae!!! If you don\'t like the algae, brush them off every time you change the water, change the water more often, use a stronger filter, and add a little salt to the water (see further up). In the wild, it is normal for turtle to grow algae on their shells. It helps them camouflage! In captivity, the algae should be removed every once in a while, since they can encourage growth of fungus in a confined environment. To remove the algae, hold your turtle under warm tap water and gently brush it with a soft vegetable brush.
Flash
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Thanks for the info!
reptileman
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I don\'t mean to eavesdrop, but that was very helpful! I always thought algae in the water meant I was doing something wrong!
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