Sick turtle - help!

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Casey and Nick
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Please help.

My turtle Maude is sick. She\'s not eating. She\'s sleeping all day. She has white foam around her mouth. I just noticed that she has a light brown algae/infection between on her body between her head and her arms (under her shell).

She\'s always been really active.

Harold is fine. He\'s not sick.

They\'re babies.

What can I do??

Please help!

Thank you,

Casey
bonnie_lynn2001
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when my res was sick i lowered the water in the tank. make sure the water is about 80
i took him out for a hour at a time in a dry seperate tank w/ the basking light put him back in the water for an hour alternated all day and i got dr. turtle for the water that was in the tank change the water every day
i think the thing that helps the most is heat keep him warm
Casey and Nick
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Thank you for your help.

we\'re really concerned because they both seem to be gasping (making squeaking noises with their throats) - -

Also, Harold has now been eating Maude\'s food and he\'s getting really big -- possibly growing out of his shell? His head is really big.

is this normal or should he not eat for a while??

Thanks.

Casey and NIck
bonnie_lynn2001
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AILMENTS



A turtle kept under proper conditions will seldom get sick. A healthy turtle should feel heavy for its size, have bright clear eyes and eat well. Before introducing a new turtle into a community tank, it should be kept in an antibiotic solution for five days. A water-soluble drug such as Oxytetracycline Hydrochloride (250 mg) dissolved in warm water will treat a ten-gallon tank. The solution must be changed every 12 hours. If a sick turtle is found in your tank or pond, it must be isolated, its temperature raised to 80 degrees – 85 degrees F and treatment started. Ailments in water turtles are often difficult to detect. One important thing to observe is the behavior of your turtles. Look for unusual conduct, such as lack of appetite, poor equilibrium in the water or continued basking after lights in the aquarium are turned off, or if outside, basking after dark.



Respiratory Infection:



If you can recognize a respiratory infection before it becomes pneumonia you may be able to treat it without using antibiotic injections. The symptoms are swollen eyes with lids shut, off feed, white mucus dripping from eyes and/or nose, listlessness, open mouth breathing and/or heavy breathing noises. Parotid abscesses are also associated with respiratory infections although they may have other causes as well.



Environmental Causes: Removing a turtle from its high humidity natural climate to live in an arid climate such as Southern California.



Drastic nightly temperature drops unlike what the turtle experiences in its natural habitat.

Lack of variety and nutrients in its diet.

Unclean living conditions.

Habitat too small.

Lack of heat source.

Lack of sunlight and fresh air.

Stress, such as moving the turtle from one yard to another.



Prevention is the best medicine; however help may be possible if you act quickly. Materials needed:



a. Plastic sweater box with lid.

b. Heating pad.

c. Aquarium thermometer.



Place the heating pad in a secluded area where it will be undisturbed and set it on the medium setting. Place the sweater box on the heating pad and place about one inch of water in the sweater box. Heat the water to a temperature of 95 degrees F. Place the lid on the sweater box so that it is left open about one inch and ensure the temperature remains constant at 95 degrees F. If it gets too warm, slide the sweater box off the heating pad a little until the desired temperature is achieved. Watch it closely. Place the turtle in the water in the sweater box. Ensure that the water level is comfortable for the turtle. It should only have to lift its head slightly to breathe. DO NOT make the turtle swim. Change the water twice each day. Due to bacterial build-up, it is very important to keep the water clean.



The purpose is the creation of a high humidity environment, which will help to re-hydrate the turtle and also help it to breathe and cleanse orifices. The raised temperature will speed up the turtles’ metabolism helping it to eliminate toxins and encourage its appetite. Watch it very closely. Within three days the turtle should show improvement. Offer its favorite food (mealworms are usually most tempting). Trout Chow and fish may be tried.



If after three days, there is no improvement in the turtles’ health, seek immediate assistance from a veterinarian knowledgeable in treating turtles.



After environmental causes are eliminated slowly re-adjust it to its new habitat for a few hours each day. Return it to the sweater box for the remainder of the time. Do not return the turtle to the environment that caused the illness. Studies have shown that raising the temperature of most reptiles for long periods is the best hospital environment. Some studies are also addressing the PH level of the turtles’ water for the prevention or cure of many ailments including parasite infestation. Turtles from forest habitats may require slightly acidic water. Others from drier areas may require more alkaline water. Don’t forget to refer to a geography book to make the best possible habitat for the turtle.
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