someone answer this has been up for about 5 days already...

Post any questions you have about a turtle indoor setup here. Or if you have a link to your indoor setup picture we would love to see it.
Locked
TamaraN
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 2:56 pm
Contact:

need to know where I can get a cheap good heater?... I bought one of those stick on thermometer things and it says that the water is like 75 degrees so should I get a heater anyway ? and also i have one of those fish tanks that have a light on the lid is that light good enough for my turtles i need to know so if it\'s not i could go buy one ?and I want to know what else could i feed my turtles i feed them floating sticks,sun dried shrimp, and some little pellets any other suggestions? please reply soon... Thanks much
Sennyo
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Feb 11, 2003 3:18 pm
Contact:

uhh.. I\'m not really much more than a newbie at this but.....

I don\'t have a submersible heater yet, but it\'s what I\'m looking to get. There\'s a link under the indoor turtle setup section of this webpage to petsmart online where you can get one for about 20 bucks.. something like that. They have them for a bit cheaper than that at Pets Plus out by my mom, but I don\'t know what pet stores are near you.

75 degrees isn\'t bad as far as an acceptable range (or so I\'ve read, it\'s supposed to be around 75-80 degrees or something like that) you should probably check the indoor setup section for exact tempuratures, I\'m just trying to remember them off hand. I usually keep my tank at around 80, and the basking area at about 85.

The fish tank I bought also came with a lil flourescent light in the lid, but I Don\'t believe they emit UVA and UVB rays, which your turtle needs. I went to the pet store and bought an actual reptile flourescent bulb. it cost me around 24 dollars or so (guessing again) And needs to be replaced about once a year. Also, I don\'t know about your fish tank, but mine came w/ a transparent plastic cover right under the light area. That needs to be removed, as the UV rays can\'t get through the glass or plastic.

As for other things to feed them...

Mine absolutely adores cooked chicken and turkey and stuff like that. (we let her join the family for thanksgiving and she ate like a lil pig) They just say not to feed them too much of it since they\'ll outgrow their shells if they\'re eating too much protien. Others I\'ve heard have fed their lil ones pieces of earthworms, crickets, lil river bugs, feeder goldfish... Older turtles are more vegetarian. As for veggies I\'m not really sure... I know they\'ll eat romaine lettuce and that kind of thing.. Just don\'t give them iceberg lettuce. (not sure why, I\'ve just been told not to)

Hope this helps somewhat. And sorry for the novel.

If anyone else has any suggestions or corrections please feel free to post. This is just random tidbits I\'ve managed to pick up along the way.
TamaraN
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 2:56 pm
Contact:

thank you it\'s about time someone answered me and the veggies well my little one likes carrots should i be feeding them carrots?...well thanks
Sennyo
Level 2
Level 2
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Feb 11, 2003 3:18 pm
Contact:

Ive found a few other sites that mention giving their turtles carrots :) I don\'t see why it would be a problem.

Yet another interesting site I found ( that includes a \"home meals\" Dietary plan)

http://free-zg.hinet.hr/turtle/index.html

Not sure how accurate it is, since it just came up in a google search, but it mentions carrots!
TamaraN
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2003 2:56 pm
Contact:

ok thanks again ...you are a real help:)
Sakmet
Level 1
Level 1
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2003 10:41 am
Contact:

Excellent info by Krazy4Kritterz who is a moderator of another turtle forum.


Hatchlings should each once each day, only as much as he\'ll consume in about 15 minutes. As he grows, you can reduce feedings to every other day. Full grown adults can eat 2-3 times per week.

Vegetation should always be available at all times for every aged slider. Aquatic plants like anacharis, cabomba, hornwort, water hyacinth, etc... should be kept in the tank and available for whenever the turtle wants to eat it. Remember not to get stuck on one type of plant. Variety is very important.

50% of your adult turtle\'s diet should be made up of vegetation and plant matter. These can be the plants like I mentioned above, as well as leafy green vegetables such as dandelion, mustard, and turnip greens, parsley, kale, etc...

Baby sliders won\'t always readily accept plant matter as food. This is ok. Just keep offering it anyways and as he grows he will begin to eat it. Besides, the plants make nice decorations in the cage. :)

25% of the adult\'s diet should be made up of protien rich foods. Whole live feeder fish, insects, snails, worms, a prekilled cut up pinky mouse, small amounts of shrimp as a treat only, even some scrambled egg with the shell in it, are good to offer. Variety is very important and no one food item should ever be fed too much.

The last 25% of the diet can include high quality pelleted foods, if your turtle will eat them. Many people feed these as the main, staple diet. This is not a good idea and can make a slider grow too fast or cause a lack of or too many nutrients. Pellets can be added to already complete diets, but should never be the only thing offered.

Many people feed their sliders pieces of meat, dog food, hamburger, and other such foods. These items have little to no nutritional value and should never be offered. They are completly unnatural.
Raw meats in particular are dangerous and can lead to salmanella poisoning. Cooked meats are just plain not good for turtles. Pieces of cooked fish can even cause nutrient deficiencies.

Whole live fish, however, are an excellent food source. Turtles need all of the guts and organs that come from eating a whole animal or insect.
Locked
  • Information
  • Who is online

    Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests