All posts in "Turtle"
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Spotted Turtle (Clemmys Guttata)

Geographical Region: They are found from Maine to Florida. Size: An average of 4 inches, less than 5 inches in length. Habitat: They prefer quiet marshy meadows and shallow ponds. Food: Omnivorous, they eat worms, slugs, snails, insects, melons, and butter lettuce. Interesting Fact: These turtles like to hide under plants, sticking just their head […]

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Turtle First Aid – Turtle Shell Repair

​How can I repair my turtle’s shell? Unfortunately, this is not a do it yourself kind of thing. If your turtle has a cracked shell, it needs to go to a vet. The animal will need anesthetic and professional care to ensure it is properly taken care of and no infections form. If you find […]

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Turtle First Aid – Turtle Not Eating

​My turtle is not eating Is the temperature of the tank warm enough? If turtles get too cold, they don’t eat as much and start thinking about their long winters nap. Does your turtle like the food you are offering? Some turtles, like humans, are very picky eaters. They have their favorites and their not […]

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Turtle First Aid – Turtle Prolapse

Does my turtle have prolapse?​ What is happening is the turtle’s insides are coming out of the opening on the tail. It is the intestines and their reproductive organs. This doesn’t hurt much, but it is very annoying. It’s a normal occurrence, and no one knows why it happens. The turtle is not aware of […]

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Turtle First Aid – Skin Rashes or Wounds

I think my turtle has a rash on it’s skin ​Take your turtle out of the water and keep it dry. Disinfect them with beta dine or a mixture of equal parts Nolvosan and water. Take your turtle to a vet if the problem doesn’t seem to get better or gets worse. What Next? Well… […]

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Turtle First Aid – Turtles and Algae

What do you do when you see Algae on your turtle? Well nothing really, generally speaking it is not harmful to your turtle.Algae growing on a turtle shell is normal. In fact most wild turtles have some algae growing on their carapace. That being said you can’t completely ignore the algae on the shell. There […]

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Turtle First Aid – Shell Sores or Holes in Shell

My turtle has sores or holes on it’s shell ​Remove your turtle immediately from the water and keep it dry. To prevent your turtle from dehydrating, soak them for 30 minutes twice a day. Sponge your turtle off with Betadine or Nolvasan several times a day, especially after soaking them. Keep your turtle warm. Drying […]

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Turtle First Aid – Soft Shell Spots

My turtle has some soft spots on it’s shell ​Your turtle’s shell should be hard and solid, except for softshell turtles. You should not be able to push dents or find any soft patches. The most common cause of a soft shell is a lack of calcium or vitamin D3. They can get calcium through […]

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Turtle First Aid – Vitamin K Deficiency

​My turtle may have a vitamin K deficiency ​Bleeding through the mouth is a common indication of vitamin K deficiency. Lack of vegetables seems to be the main cause. To treat this you should give the animal vitamin K and change their diet to include more veggies. I also highly suggest taking them to the […]

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Turtle First Aid – Swollen Eyes and Vitamin A Deficiencies

My turtle has swollen eyes ​Swollen eyes are common in turtles and usually pneumonia related. Poor nutrition and dirty water could cause this as well. If your turtle is sluggish, not eating, or shows any other symptom along with the swollen eyes, take your turtle to the vet. It sounds like your turtle may have […]

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